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About The Alliance
Our Principles
We believe that all Maine people have a right to a healthy environment where we live, work and play.
We envision a future free of exposure to harmful chemicals in our air, water or food.
We want our children to grow up healthy with every opportunity to thrive.
We seek to build a healthy economy that provides good jobs producing clean products and services.
We are proud of all that’s been accomplished so far toward a clean and healthy Maine.

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This report is a collaborative effort of the Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families coalition, a campaign dedicated to protecting American families from toxic chemicals. The report incorporates a significant body of peer-reviewed science on chemicals and health. Download the report.

 

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Join the Citizen’s Right-to-Know Phthalates Campaign!

Our Citizen-Backed Proposal
Right now, retailers and consumers are left in the dark as to which products contain phthalates. Our proposal to the Maine Department of Environmental Protection calls for requiring manufacturers of household products to report that information publicly. We need your help so that parents, pregnant women and all Mainers know which products contain these harmful chemicals.

Visit our Phthalates Right-to-Know page!
 News and Events
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Common pesticides 'can kill frogs within an hour'
The Guardian - 1/24/2013. 
By Damian Carrington - Widely used pesticides can kill frogs within an hour, new research has revealed, suggesting the chemicals are playing a significant and previously unknown role in the catastrophic global decline of amphibians.
It’s Unanimous: Board of Environmental Protection Formalizes Decision on BPA
ACHM Announcements - 1/24/2013. 
(AUGUSTA) After seven months of public hearings, scientific presentations, and technical analysis, the Maine Board of Environmental Protection voted unanimously this morning to replace the chemical bisphenol-A, or BPA, in infant formula and baby food packaging with safer alternatives. Now the rule will go to the Maine Legislature for review.
Pesticides & prostate cancer. Again.
Pesticide Action Network - 1/23/2013. 
A study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology reports that workers in Iowa and North Carolina exposed to certain organophosphate and organochlorine pesticides had significantly higher prostate cancer risk. The organophosphate pesticides fonofos, terbufos and malathion, one of the most commonly used organophosphate insecticides in the United States, was linked to increased prostate cancer risk; and a family history of prostate cancer combined with exposure to organochlorine pesticides (such as aldrin and lindane) was significantly associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer.
Warnings From a Flabby Mouse
New York Times - 1/19/2013. 
By Nicholas D. Kristof - One of the puzzles of the modern world is why we humans are growing so tubby. Maybe these two mice offer a clue. They’re genetically the same, raised in the same lab and given the same food and chance to exercise. The only difference is that the top one was exposed at birth to just one part per billion of an endocrine-disrupting chemical.
Chemicals That Promote Obesity Down the Generations
Living On Earth - 1/18/2013. 
Conventional wisdom says over-eating and the lack of exercise are behind the obesity epidemic in America and much of the world. But that’s not the whole story, according to some new research from the University of California, Irvine, that implicates certain chemicals called "obesogens."
Eat Like a Mennonite
New York Times - 1/18/2013. 
By Florence Williams - My 7-year-old daughter and I recently participated in a pilot study conducted in 2011 by the Silent Spring Institute and the Breast Cancer Fund. We wanted to see what it would take to nudge down our bodies’ levels of a handful of common chemicals with the potential to mimic or disrupt hormones.
Mercury emissions threaten ocean, lake food webs
Environmental Health News - 1/18/2013. 
By Brian Bienkowski - As United Nations delegates end their mercury treaty talks today, scientists warn that ongoing emissions are more of a threat to food webs than the mercury already in the environment. At the same time, climate change is likely to alter food webs and patterns of mercury transport in places such as the Arctic, which will further complicate efforts to keep the contaminant out of people and their food.
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